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environment we heard about how a lot of the coverage around elections wasn't particularly polarized. there are undoubtedly concerns around the future of where this is going to be. fragile my work is on states in general. fragile states tend to be fractured state. and we are seeing an increase in the fragmented and fractured media in afghanistan and the most fractured part of that getting quiteably significant injections of funding at the moment. if the last length -- it is the that isng for a state trying to chart its own national identity -- it is not necessarily a useful way of going. but as the media -- but the media is becoming ever more fractured and fragile. >> how solid do you think is the support that you expect to see in terms ofection governmental support for the concept of a free media? i know there was discussion recently about freedom of the press in afghanistan. >> again, when you compare it to other countries, afghanistan has had a remarkable -- has managed to create a remarkable space of freedom of media. this is because -- we should give credit to president karzai .
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in a safe environment. more than a change in government, we want a true change in the country. we don't want to live in other countries, we want to change venezuela. >> tens of thousands of opposition supporters rallied across the capital in a large display of unrest. sunday's march through the capital was overwhelmingly peaceful. later hundreds engaged in standoffs with the police. it did not reach levels of violence seen at other protests. >> president nicolas maduro cracked down hard at the protest. there has been fatalities and dozens injured and arrested. the governments have been holding peace talks. the opposition and many gaoled. >> this is the annual carnival weekend. under different circumstances most of the people protesting will be sitting on the beach. they can't celebrate when many have been killed or taken prisoner. >> nicolas maduro gave people two extra days off for carnival. so far it has not worked. people have brought the beach to the protest. . >> translation: the people are calling for deep political change and it doesn't get that venezuela woke up. it's demanding human
environment rich with new vocabulary. >> we use big words in here all the time because we are constantly communicating with them about their day. >> for parents, the cost of sending her here is well worth it. >> we wanted to take money that we might've spent on other things and invested in their education. it is not just education, but it is the sense of socialization, and i think it ultimately gets these kids ahead at a young age. >> that on the other side of town, a world apart, they are doing the dishes together. she has seen a change for the better in her daughter, who has started chatting more. >> before i did not give her the chance to express herself. i would be doing most of the talking. now, i give her a chance to express herself, so she does not get frustrated and angry. >> it has already helped some in their daily lives. i can loves her books, tell you, and hopefully that will help her chances. that brings us to a close, but you can continue watching us on our 24-hour news channel. thanks for watching. >> funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation,
's taking place and chaos a that they are trying to create an environment of ungovern apparently. as we see, things are dying out in terms of the momentum that these protests have. i think it's unfortunate that they don't respect the rules of democracy and some of the constitution as well. it allows for a recall referendum against any elected official. if they want him out. >> if it's so democratic, why do they kink out cnn and correspondents, report that more than 60 reporters in venzuela have been beaten and their material stolen from them and you have the president calling anybody who opponents they can oligarchs and fascists? >> he has employed that language. i wouldn't contest that because he has done so and he is calling on a class of people who have eroded the democracy and that ran the country into the ground and that, you know, today, those same people, not all of them. >> some would argue with the socialist government has run the government in the ground. >> that's not true. you cited figures for inflation but they were higher before. >> they weren't. >> actually not when chavez.
environment to work in. we should point out, these three individuals, these al jazeera journalists are among thousands of protesters, activists and other journalists who are facing a similar ordeal many say it's trials like this and other detentions that are a troubling sign that egypt is going back to a repressive, authoritative state instead of going towards fulfilling the promises of the 2011 revolution. >> syrian government forces are waging a campaign of siege warfare and starvation against civilians as part of the military campaign against rebel fighters. >> that's among the findings of a u.n.-mandated independent report which has just been released. the investigation, catalogue of the suffering 250,000 people who are besieged across syria, government forces were accused of denying basic aid in order to force people to choose between surrender and stashation. war crimes have been committed by opposition groups. more from geneva >> reporter: this is that report. 7th report of the independent international commission on inquiry on syria since that commission was set up by the u.n. in 201
in that environment was not correcting the problem. it was enhancing the problem. >> reporter: they hemmed to write georgia's juvenile laws. they say they're better off being rehabilitated in their home where rather than being influenced by older hardened offenders. >> what we found out a lot of these children coming into the system were not really bad children. they were doing dumb things. so we wanted to find a better way of treating them under the local level. >> reporter: georgia is following states like texas and louisiana by diverting juveniles to community-based programs. >> runaway or possession of alcohol, rather than having those children detained, is there there are interventions that will happen between the youth and specific state agencies to get to the underlying cause. >> reporter: a new commission is in charge of making sure that the programs are consistent and effective scenario across the s. the state also believes they will save a lot of money in this change. the community based programs the governor said will cut the costs to $3,000 a year. the laws will prevents judges from acc
, look, in a hyper partisan environment where he has to run for re-election, an issue like this can be polarized. any issue around race, as you know, wolf, sends people to their full rise corners. the last thing the president wants to do when he's running for re-election is to have a country more polarized. i think the beauty of this time now is you can have more risky conversations that are important for moving this country forward right now in his second term. so i'm thankful that he did. >> i want to play another excerpt from the president's powerful speech. cornell and don, both of you listen to this. >> no excuses. government and philanthropy, faith-based communities, we've got to help you knock down some of the barriers that you experience. that's what we're here for. but you've got responsibilities, too. and i know you can meet the challenge. many of you already are, if you make the effort. it may be hard, but you will have to reject the cynicism that the circumstances of your birth or societies injustices necessarily defines you and your future. it will take courage but you'
these the environment you want, uaw certain slit people for you to -- are the people to choose. they can't help with the wages. you have got a facility that's the most advanced, environmentally sound facility in the world right here in chattanooga, tennessee. so, what's this about? it's about one thing. it's about money and it's about power. >> now, in the arena of public opinion, do you think most common sense folks would say, that's involvement? that's real involvement in an election? overall, corker flat-out lied about the united auto workers union. >> we support the works council notion that they are trying to implement. we just had concerns about the uaw. we know of their track record. we know what's happened in communities were they've been located. we know they have been a job-destroying entity through the years. >> no, no, no, no. corker is lying when he makes comments like that about the uaw. uaw has saved thousands of johns all over the country and they have the numbers to back it up. let me be clear, folks. corker's intimidation of plant workers was absolutely unprecedented. never in
the russian border where they worried their way of life is under threat. >>> plus china's choking environment, smog reaching critical levels. and a change in athletic history. we have more next. we are not meant to be your first choice for entertainment. al jazeera america. we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. >> we pursue that story beyond the headline, pass the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capital. >> we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. >> and follow it no matter where it leads - all the way to you. al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> welcome back to the top stories here on al jazeera. russia has promised to protect its naval fleet in southern ukraine. thprotests have continued into turkey for a second day over a corruption scandal involving the prime minister. turkey's president signed a new law tightening the government's grip on the judiciary which has been investigating claims of corr
into the wrong hands in the middle of a very volatile security environment? >> mr. chairman, in lebanon, much as we have in many other countries, we have an office of defense cooperation in beirut. their primary purpose truly is to ensure that we have the appropriate safeguards, and that were performing the appropriate end-user monitoring is what we call it when we provide foreign military sales of equipment, partner nations. so our u.s. personnel in the office of defense cooperation in beirut will do that and enhance end-user monitoring to ensure that that equipment is both accounted for and being used properly. >> i found it interesting in the dialogue with the lebanese armed forces their take on the saudi arabia and french potential for receipt of saudi arabia and assistance to purchase french military assets. they said they liked the was equipment a lot better, basically is what the lebanese armed forces was saying. but i gather from your testimony, general, you do like the more partners the better, the more systems the better. you don't find that saudi arabia provision of 3 billion to pu
in these countries, and the gcc is meant to encourage cooperation on the economy and the environment. those are being tested. >>> the former ambassador to the u.n. said ca qatar, we have notg to do with egypt. they are free to deal with their own issues, but we will never support. this is unacceptable. we are in the 21st century. egyptian people are our people. so any dictator coming forward through the blood of his own people, and they want us to support that dictator, that's taking us back. these countries have voted for a dictatorship. if we say, listen, it is your business if you want to support dictators, but we're not going to support dictators. having said that, that should not come back with our relationship. we are opposed to any intervention of outside powers of any of these states. >> let's go to saudi arabia, where we find a columnist a. having a difference of opinion is one thing. being accused of interfering with the internal affairs of another country, let's take saudi arabia, that's another thing entirely. what has infuriated saudi? >> playing with the mix of islam religion and politi
such as entities committed to protecting and preserving our nation's environment natural resources or the communities that could be directly impacted by such activities. to be clear, i strongly support the rights of industry to have an opportunity to provide comments on proposed rules. it fosters more informed quality rulemaking and benefits both business and broader society. indeed, that's why our current administrative procedures mandate that a public comment process be conducted to allow any individual or corporation to participate and provide input and feedback in an equal, fair and open process. that's current law. the amendment that congresswoman duckworth and i are proposing today would simply ensure that all participants in the rulemaking process be provided equal consultation rights with agencies. for example, as the ranking member, mr. cummings, noted earlier, if the u.s. department of agriculture were to have a rule in an effort to protect the health of everyday americans, our amendment would ensure that not only the agribusinesses but also food safety experts, children'
everybody else. and this makes for a very toxic environment. i think for everybody going into november. bill: you agree. >> absolutely agreeing. in fact that is one of the reasons why the obama administration are positioning themselves on the side of the people for fairness, for redistribution against the republican party, bill, that has no narrative. that has no arguement. that just says no. bill: back on this poll, quickly. 25% of the democrats expressed that disappointment. >> i think they should. bill: are they disappointed in him and his policies or think he is not liberal enough. >> some say he is not liberal enough. others say they are disappointed in his policies or result of his policies. the fact that there is gridlock and no progress. bill: thanks to both of you. >> thank you. bill: 40% of independents are not happy. >> right. bill: that is really -- >> harbinger of ill for the administration. bill: thank you, doug. thank you, monica. what's next, martha? martha: coming up the poet giving a kiss to a little admirer. why the pontiff's mini-me caused quite a sensation in st. peter's
commitments to sustain that. it is the question of what the ifc and the world bank called enabling environment. there's not a shortage of money. they are enormously wealthy. they are regional investors. they would like to put money in, but can they trust in the rules of the game and the rules of law to do that. minerals are not going to be a magic bullet, but oil and gas resources that are being discovered recently are quite immense. inis not inconceivable that 10-15 years, they can more than underwrite the cost of sustaining said -- sustaining stability. in conclusion, let's move from thinking of quick fixes and magic bullets to understanding that peace and stability and governance were at the heart of peace and stability. it is the many small wins that will deliver this for afghans. the question is can the politics deliver something that the middle 90% of afghans who order and law and want that feature -- and want that future can realize it. you very much, andrew. it is a great pleasure to be here. i want to join you and others in thanking u.s. ip and others in sponsoring this. it is humblin
it is a question of what the ifc in the world bank called the enabling environment essentially the trust of businesses and there's not a shortage of money. there are enormously wealthy afghans in regional investors who would like to put money in but the question is can they trust in the rule of law to do that? the rules that govern the extract is section particularly. there will not be a magic bullet that the oil and gas resources being discovered recently are quite immense and it's not inconceivable that in 10 to 15 years they can more than underwrite the cost of sustaining stability and services within the country. so in conclusion i think let's move from looking for quick fixes and magic olefson understanding peace and stability and governance will be a key part of the stability and rather than a victory or deal that will deliver for afghans and the question can the politics deliver that 90% of afghans who believe and law and order and what that future can realize. >> david. >> thank you very much and it's a great pleasure to be here. i join you and others in thanking usip, voa and us
not try to do something to stop it. >> i would try to provide a safe environment for them to express their feelings. >> what bob is saying speaks to the victory of fear over freedom. the freedom of expression is designed specifically for incidents like this when risk is involved. you're supposed to have this protection, even under threat of violence. every parent on monday should put their kid in a flag, put a flag on their shirt, on their lapel, and send them to school. not as a sign of patriotism, but as a sign of freedom. make that expression so much more powerful than any, anything you could ever do. this is wrong. >> i agree. bob, it's just like the katy perry removing her -- removing the islamic symbol. because of fearing a filmmaker. we're changing the way we live out of fear. >> we're changing constitution, is the problem. >> the american justice on the appeals court voted for this. i assume it's not a democratic liberal message here. >> what message is it saying? if you really care about the country and if you don't, you can intimidate by fear. so anyone else, they can just
is he lived in a forgiving environment. he had a mom and teachers and adults who looked out for him. his hope was that these young men would have the chances that he had. programs that are improving these boys' lives amount putting them on -- and putting them on a positive trajectory, so we can touch many, many more men and do what we know will work. that's good not just for moral reasons but that it's good for our economy. they are our workforce of tomorrow and we hav should inven them. >> you talk about what's important for economy and business and you will need the cooperation of business. >> the president said this is not another big federal program. in fact we shouldn't require additional resources. we should be smarter about how we use the resources that we do have. we should make sure that the funds that we have are going to support programs that work and creating incentives for programs that work. but this responsibility comes down on the business community. and they have responsibility. they can provide summer jobs. internships, mentorship, funding of not for profit provide thes
of the new media environment. the consumer is a much more in control. you just have to wait to be spoonfed when of the major networks wanted to give you. now there's this rich cornucopia, and your biggest challenge is to sit through the vast array of information available to you. it is there if you want to find it very -- it. the: we're talking about president and his 90 minute conversation with vladimir putin. i think vladimir putin views barack obama? guest: how shall i put this? i think he holds him and minimal high regard. warning sign that he was start taking him lightly was in september 2009. it was september 17. on that fateful day, barack obama made a unilateral decision, without insulting his allies that he was going to and the program that had been developed under the previous administration to build missile defense systems in the czech republic and poland, two of our strongest allies. the czech and polish government had really gone out on a limb and sacrificed a lot of credibility and prestige. their product -- they thought tremendous little battles to get these bases approved c
the planet but that's cool. you're in a region like the middle east where multiproliferation environment where everybody hasn't policy and nobody trusts anyone us. that is the most unstable environment. that was "open range." the hero goes into the town and there are 14 side in town. one person starts shooting and everybody starts shooting everybody else. if you have a nuclear-armed middle east that is the must dangerous situation imaginable. that is the great fear. but i can absolutely tell you that is where we're headed. nobody has a plan to get away from that. these negotiations will not only not stop the nuclear program, they will insure that the next president will have even more difficult challenge keeping iran from going nuclear. that is one of the, the greatest legacy of this administration. sir? >> ross kaminsky from boulder county and lpr 2005. one of the big things we'll hear in the upcoming primary season, john mccain versus rand paul. how should americans think about what foreign engage amentses, what foreign entertaining fellments are actually in our national interests vers
in these young men. and the only difference is that i kbru up in an environment that was a little bit more forgiving. >> congressman elijah cummings joining us right now, a democratic congressman from maryland. i know you were there in the east room of the white house, congressman. take us inside for you personally what was it like to hear the president really express these kinds of emotions? >> i tell you, it made me feel emotional, wolf, as an african-american man who was once an african-american boy. and to see those young men standing there. but the fact is that not only did the presidency himself in those boys, wolf, he allowed those boys to see themselves in him. and that is very, very critical. and that's the part that's been missing. we've got a president who has been elevated to where he is. but a lot of those young boys probably felt at some time this was unreachable. by him allowing himself to be seen, that is, to strip himself and let them know that he had been through what they had been through, i think is made a tremendous difference. as a matter of fact, one of the young boy
that someone sees a gun on to how can we do this being least disruptive in a learning environment. and there's a lot of work to be done that lies ahead of us. >> there's one estimate that that work's going to cost over $2 million including retraining of police officers involved but now they're going to have to distinguish between good guns and bad guns on campus. where before all guns were bad on campus. greg, it seems to me that you might have some better educational purposes for that $2 million. >> well, yeah. and i think as a lot of letter writers have pointed out, i don't know nothing about guns, and i shouldn't have one. but with nine hours' training i too can become a hobbyist police officer and be authorized to bring a gun on campus and to use it according to my nine hours of training. i don't want vigilantes protecting me in my classroom. i think vigilante justice is best practiced at home. and i have nothing against it. just no, thanks, i don't need them to have guns if they're not trained officers of the law or have extensive experience. and people around them, professionals who wi
. but it is a different environment fundamentally from any other kind of dealing with putin. one has to understand where he is right now. his policy initiatives have been very rash. you don't do what he does unless you think the stakes are very high and in his view i think he believes the political forces out of this recent political crisis has now led yukraine to position where russia is losing it to the eu and nato and he believes that's happened in part if not engineered by the u.s. and the eu and others then strongly supported by it and come to have an exceedingly negative view of the administration, of the americans and it will be very hard to do any kind of a deal with him where you get back to the clinton proposition to trust him on a deal. we're in a different world with putin right now. >> okay. but let me ask you this. madeline albright called him delusional. is he completely delusional in reading the country with a country on the doorstep, right on the border? is he delusional or is he right to be quite paranoid about the situation and in his own way he believes acting in the best entrust of
states. dina cappiello, the national environment reporter for the associated press, joins me now. 27 1/2 million dollars in finds, $200 million for the cleanup. in the range of penalty, how does this rank? >> it's the biggest ever for a company that violates its water pollution permits. other companies that paid big fines in the past in 2008, the e.p.a. said this is the biggest ever for a company that violated permits it had from states. >> ifill: describe the pollution. >> we're talking about 6,000 violations over 300 state-issued permits, hundreds of streams, tributaries and rivers, 79 active coal minus, over 20 coal processing plants where they put the coal and wash it before it's shipped, over five appalachian states, so it's a pretty massive coverage area for the settlement. >> reportersettlement. >> ifill: how did the discharges occur? >> they're actually piped into the waterways and states issue permits for the companies that give them certain limits and in this case this company repeatedly from 2006 to 2013 exceeded those limits, that they were actually authorized to discharge.
an environment of transparency, contributing to rising confidence in the electoral process. the successful voter registration drive begun during the summer of 2013 in which new voters registered by the millions, largely without incident, also demonstrates greater iec capacity. although there is, although there is thus room for optimism in the iec's performance, overt political pressure could of course still derail this progress. fortunately political entities have so far largely refrained from interfering in the electoral preparations and indeed afghan officials have even been disciplined for engaging in political activity. the independent electoral complaints commission is a relatively new institution. permanently established through the passage of a new electoral law. the ecc successfully adjudicated complaints stemming from candidate registrations in october but has since made slower progress. the slow pace of appointing provincial officers delayed the establishment of provincial electoral complaint commission offices and memorandum of understanding between the i.e. c and ecc to colocate in p
, and i -- i think it's impossible in this environment to get anything done comprehensively. comprehensive immigration reform. comprehensive tax reform. the reason we had comprehensive health care reform, in spite of what you think about it, is because you had one party controlling the house, the senate and the white house. and so to do things comprehensively, i think it's tough on either side to get something done. i think you have to, you know, get more -- you're going to have more three yard gains in an environment that we operate in washington. you're going to have more three yard gains, than you're going to have 30-yard gains. it's just the reality of the system. so there's much in the bill that i think you could point to that was positive. but there's obviously a lot of things that even republicans would have concern about. to say that we'll create $700 billion in new revenue, alex, that's an assumption over a ten-year period of time, assuming that chairman camp would be the chairman of ways and means over the next ten years. i would buy into that. but even with that, that probably p
and world bank call enabling environment. that is essentially the trust of businesses in the rule of law. it is not a shortage of money. there are enormously wealthy afghans and regional investors would like to put money but the question is can they trust in the rules of the game and world of law to do that. what would be the rules that governor enthe sector in particular. minerals will not be the magic bullet but oil and gas resources discovered recently have been quite immense. it is not inconceivable in 10 to 15 years this can more than underwrite the cost of the sustaining services within the country. so in conclusion i think let's move from looking for the quick fixes and magic bullets understanding that peace and stability, governance will be at the heart of peace and is it stability and small wins will win for the after bans and the question, can the politics deliver something that the 90% of afghans who believe in more than 90% believe in law and order and want that future can realize it. >> thank you. david. >> thank you very much andrew. it is a quite a pleasure to be here. i w
with a disability, that they can do that in a tax-free -- i should say a tax-advantaged environment and so they can save over time and do it in a manner that doesn't put them at a disadvantage from a tax standpoint down the road. so sara is a great example of why the able act should pass, and she is doing more than her share to make sure that it does pass, so i'm grateful to sara wolfe for doing that. especially grateful to people like sara who like a lot of us at some point in our lives have to overcome the tragedy. sara lost her mother connie not too long ago to a sudden and rapid illness, but she has been able to -- to deal with that tragedy and still help us day in and day out to get the able act passed. i will highlight one more story and then i will conclude. angie king is a 28-year-old who lives in indianapolis, indiana, and like sara wolfe, she lives with downs syndrome. she has had -- angie has had five different jobs and works five days a week. she works paid positions at kohl's on mondays and at the ymca on fridays. on tuesdays, wednesdays and thursdays, she volunteers for several organi
an already tense environment. robert siri will travel to geneva today where he will brief the secretary general on his mission to ukraine and discuss further possible steps. the secretary general is gravely concerned that the situation has further deteriorated since yesterday's meeting of the council. in this regard, let me reiterate the secretary general's important messages conveyed in his statement of today. and i quote, "the secretary general continues to closely follow the seriously and rapidly unfolding events in ukraine, including developments in crimea, and is gravely concerned about the deterioration of the situation. the secretary general reiterates his call for the full respect for and preservation of the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of ukraine. he calls for an immediate restoration of calm and direct dialogue between all concerned to solve the current crisis. the secretary general will be speaking with president vladimir putin of russia shortly about the situation in ukraine" unquote. let me say in closing, at this crucial moment it is important to rec
they destroy our environment. madam president, we democrats have a different vision. democrats believe the economy is strongest when the middle complas is vibrant and -- middle class is vibrant and growing. democrats believe that world-class education leads to world-class work and this work is one where people are ready to take on any challenge. right now, madam president, there's at least three people for every job that's available. democrats believe in an even playing field with higher wages, affordable health care, and a secure retirement for every american, so that every american can have a shot at success. i welcome a debate over these competing visions. the average american shares our vision for a country whose success is built on a strong middle class. the koch brothers know americans share our vision for a country whose success is built on a strong middle class. that's why rather than having an honest and fair debate, they're pouring hundreds of millions of dollars into a massive campaign of deception. they manufacture stories, make up facts. they're angry that i'm calling atte
to do to try to stabilize an environment that has become dangerous in many respects. we will have a chance talk about , a country that is of critical importance, where we have the opportunity, i think i might to move beyond recent over several west years and there is a path to transition within egypt. to security asnt well as u.s. security. we will talk about iraqi and my absolutely -- my absolute to makee -- commitment sure that it ran does not have a nuclear weapon. can potentially lead to a solution that ensures that iran is not developing a nuclear weapon. we will spend time talking about the prospect of peace between israelis and palestinians. i want to commend publicly the efforts that prime minister netanyahu have made and very link the and painstaking negotiations with my secretary of state, john kerry. are tough negotiations. the issues are profound. the reason that they would have been resolved years ago but prime minister netanyahu has approached these negotiations with a level of seriousness and commitment that reflect his leadership and the desire for the israeli peop
that type of an environment. hopefully that will improve. >> great to hear your thoughts, daniel morris from tiaa-cref's asset management. >> thanks for getting up early, appreciate it. >>> still to come, the closing keynote address at the world congress. >> the keenly awaited speech right after the break. [ male announcer ] whether it takes 200,000 parts, ♪ 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whether it's building the world's most advanced satellite, the space station, or the next leap in unmanned systems. at boeing, one thing never changes. our passion to make it real. ♪ >>> welcome back to the show. facebook and samsung have been in the main newsmakers so far at this year's mobile world dmong barcelona. the social network ceo defended his what's app acquisition and attention turns to data and cloud computing ahead of ib ibm ceo's keynote address. jon forte is live, what should we look out for? >> reporter: this should be big data day here in barcelona. we've had cisco ceo john chambers, joe tuche from emc m
are to the environment. state department releasing a sthament it might not have a significant impact. we're still waiting for the obama administration to weigh in and decide whether or not they're going to green light the construction of that pipeline. >>> the strange signs a california couple saw before realizing they'd been sitting on a golden treasure. >>> in today's office politics, joy reid most of "the reid report." and why the criticism of efforts to help young minority men. but, first, i asked joy what's at risk in kentucky's high profile senate race. >> this is one of the most races in the country. first of all, it has happened that somebody at mitch mcconnell's level has been brought down. it's possible that he could lose this thing. i don't think it's possible that he loses the primary. but it's possible that the primary drags him down with that tea party base. all of the tragedy of is fascinating. rand paul, a junior senator but really now a boss now. you've got this old-fashioned politician who tries to bring home the bacon but now can't bring home any bacon because if he brings home pork he
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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